BIM in Government

BIM in Government

Finally, the QLD State Government and the Department of State Development, Manufacturing, Infrastructure and Planning have developed a BIM implementation plan. Following on from consultation with Industry and BIM representative bodies such as BrisBIM, for feedback on a range of areas the plan was to cover, a document has been drafted and is in the public domain.

https://www.statedevelopment.qld.gov.au/infrastructure/building-information-modelling-bim.html

“All major government construction projects with an estimated capital cost of $50 million or more, which commence a detailed business case from 1 July 2019, will be required to use Building Information Modelling in accordance with the principles.”

It’s about time!

Added to this (and one of the benefits of attending BrisBIM events), one of the speakers at the June event was Brian McSweeny, the BIM Implementation Manager for TMR (Transport and Main Roads). Brian outlined the vision TMR have for implementing BIM in their organisation and was open about the complexity of introducing such drastic changes in large organisations.

https://www.linkedin.com/in/bryan-mcsweeney-1021073b/?originalSubdomain=au

As Steel Detailers it’s difficult for many of us to understand why it takes so long for organisations and government to keep up with progress because we were the early adopters of BIM, because the manufacturing sector of construction has been digitized for decades. It’s probably not such a bad thing that it’s taken so long, as much of the AEC industry is now practicing BIM and it’s likely no one in the industry who doesn’t know what an IFC file is these days! If government and the likes of TMR take up BIM now, they have a far better chance of getting it right and making their project requirements fit for purpose as the foundations for BIM in industry have already been set by the likes of Construction Modellers.

Linked In Articles Of Interest

Linkedin Articles of interest

  1. Steel Detailing and concrete forms
    https://www.linkedin.com/feed/update/urn:li:activity:6546384319701757952/
  2. Laser scanning
    https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/laser-scan-surveys-steel-fabrication-ian-brightman/
  1. Scanning and construction
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Sm8XBZ7l6hg&t=161s
  1. Steel Fabrication and Construction Network
    https://www.linkedin.com/groups/13617350/
  2. Multi story surveying
    https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/multi-storey-high-rise-spire-surveying-philip-shanks/

Bris BIM September 2019 Update

“Our purpose is to facilitate and bring together the built environment community within the greater Brisbane region, to share and exchange thoughts and knowledge in respect to technology innovation across the industry.”

By Phil Shanks

ACMA Secretary

 

http://brisbim.com/

https://www.linkedin.com/feed/update/urn:li:groupPost:4804268-6548728166507208704/

I’m finally finding my feet as sponsorship manager on the committee of BrisBIM, It’s taken a number of events this year to get into the swing of things.

The last two events have had record numbers of attendees, it would appear that the interest in this event is rising and it needs to be said that the quality of presentation delivered is probably the highest I’ve seen at any BIM related event.

On the 19th of June, the theme of the event was Infrastructure, with the sponsor being 12D. I met with Dr Lee Gregory and Lincoln Smith from 12D weeks prior to the event to secure their sponsorship. Coming from a structural background myself, I don’t know a great deal about civil and how they document drawings and models. Lee explained much of this to me, and on the night as part of his lead in presentation, explained the differences between civil and structural documents as well as civil’s place in IFC format. I found this event thoroughly interesting and PDC’s presentation at the end, on the work they are doing for Cross River rail, seemed to me to be world class. Its great seeing a Steel Detailing company using their expertise to push the industry forward and capture the audience’s attention in such a way.
http://pdcgroup.com/news/news-article/pdcs-bim-recoginsed-by-the-queensland-government

In April of this year the theme of the event was LOD (Level Of Detail), a contentious topic and once again, the attendance was at record highs. There are so many mixed feelings with regard to LOD and I am one to certainly get frustrated when I see LOD values written into project specifications with no detailed qualification on what they are to represent. So many BIM execution plans seem to be making reference to LOD and other construction related metrics, for what appears to be for the sake of it rather than really mapping out guidelines for the project team. Its little wonder that many in the AEC industry are rubbishing LOD, when in fact if qualified can be a very useful method of identification. I don’t believe LOD is going away, quite the contrary, I believe that the industry is simply struggling to utilise it effectively, and with speakers like Dr Marzia Bolpagni from Mace in the UK, who was live streamed in to the April BrisBIM event, we have a chance in Australia to see what they are doing in Europe with LOD.
https://www.linkedin.com/in/marzia-bolpagni/detail/recent-activity/posts/

The committee of BrisBIM come from all aspects of the AEC industry, they are committed, passionate and well connected. I hope to see you at the next event. Trust me, it’s well worth it. The events are at QUT bi-monthly, they are free to attend and they serve food, beer and wine!

Linkedin Articles of interest

  1. Steel Detailing and concrete forms
    https://www.linkedin.com/feed/update/urn:li:activity:6546384319701757952/
  2. Laser scanning
    https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/laser-scan-surveys-steel-fabrication-ian-brightman/
  1. Scanning and construction
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Sm8XBZ7l6hg&t=161s
  1. Steel Fabrication and Construction Network
    https://www.linkedin.com/groups/13617350/
  1. Multi story surveying
    https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/multi-storey-high-rise-spire-surveying-philip-shanks/

BIM in Government

Finally, the QLD State Government and the Department of State Development, Manufacturing, Infrastructure and Planning have developed a BIM implementation plan. Following on from consultation with Industry and BIM representative bodies such as BrisBIM, for feedback on a range of areas the plan was to cover, a document has been drafted and is in the public domain.

https://www.statedevelopment.qld.gov.au/infrastructure/building-information-modelling-bim.html

“All major government construction projects with an estimated capital cost of $50 million or more, which commence a detailed business case from 1 July 2019, will be required to use Building Information Modelling in accordance with the principles.”

It’s about time!

Added to this (and one of the benefits of attending BrisBIM events), one of the speakers at the June event was Brian McSweeny, the BIM Implementation Manager for TMR (Transport and Main Roads). Brian outlined the vision TMR have for implementing BIM in their organisation and was open about the complexity of introducing such drastic changes in large organisations.

https://www.linkedin.com/in/bryan-mcsweeney-1021073b/?originalSubdomain=au

As Steel Detailers it’s difficult for many of us to understand why it takes so long for organisations and government to keep up with progress because we were the early adopters of BIM, because the manufacturing sector of construction has been digitized for decades. It’s probably not such a bad thing that it’s taken so long, as much of the AEC industry is now practicing BIM and it’s likely no one in the industry who doesn’t know what an IFC file is these days! If government and the likes of TMR take up BIM now, they have a far better chance of getting it right and making their project requirements fit for purpose as the foundations for BIM in industry have already been set by the likes of Construction Modellers.

CROSS-AUS – Confidential Reporting on Structural Safety Australasia

In the interests of improved design and construction practice, we encourage you to have a look at the work being done by CROSS-AUS, a scheme set up to capture and share lessons learned from structural safety issues. The scheme is linked to Structural Safety in the UK who have operated in this space since 2005. We also encourage you to submit structural safety incidents you are aware of. ‘Public social justice’ is a powerful tool we have at our disposal to improve safety outcomes!

See article below:

CROSS-AUS Safety

Vale Tony Dixon

It is with great sadness we advise that former Australian Steel Institute Chief Executive Tony Dixon passed away on Friday 5 July.

Tony joined the ASI as Chief Executive in 2015 after more than 25 years in executive roles in the Australian and International steel and mining industries. Tony’s great strength over the past 4 years has been his ability to represent the entirety of the Australian steel value chain in both the public and private spheres. Tony has focused on growing the market for steel in infrastructure and construction projects in Australia, benefiting industry participants at every level. At the same time, he has ensured the ASI is a leader in innovation, compliance and safety in Australian industry.

For ASI staff he has been a strong leader, encouraging and empowering everyone to achieve their best. He was unafraid of change and strengthened strategy, governance and resilience in the organisation while always maintaining close personal relationships with his team.

On behalf of ASI staff and Members, and the whole Australian steel supply chain, we would like to acknowledge Tony’s lifetime contribution to our great industry.

We offer our heartfelt condolences to Tony’s wife Sonia and their three daughters.

Phil Casey

Interim CEO
Australian Steel Institute

ASI Steel Innovation Portal

The new ASI Steel Innovation Portal went live late last year at https://innovate.steel.org.au/. The portal is designed to positively connect industry with Australian research institutions by displaying the world-class steel-related research that is currently underway. The ASI has more than 20 universities registered on the portal, with the process of loading up projects and researcher details well underway.

New website

If you have not yet visited their new ASI website, we suggest you do so. There is a wealth of up-to-date information on structural steel and we especially recommend the Focus areas section that includes many new or updated areas such as Innovation, Quality and compliance, Steel and fire and Steel and design. A fabulous new search engine enables detailed searching of the website putting ASI’s multitude of resources at your finger-tips in no time.

The ASI Steel Australia Magazine

The Winter edition of the Steel Australia magazine included an article introducing the ACMA to the wider steel construction industry. We’d like to thank the ASI for their continued support in raising the profile of Construction Modellers and Steel Detailers around the Nation.

See articles below:
Steel Australia – Winter 2019 – ACMA
Steel Australia Magazine – Winter 2019

Building industry fairness – Security of Payments act

As the launch of Project Bank Accounts (PBA’s)to the wider construction market starts to sink in, the Queensland construction industry is being forced to address the complexities and gear up for the new environment.

The Queensland government states that these legal changes have been introduced to “safeguard progress payments, protect retention monies and allow for more timely payments to subcontractors”.

The intention is to make sure subbies get paid and in a timely fashion, indeed one legal opinion suggests that this Act will “make Queensland legislation the most weighted in favour of claimants in Australia”.

Any time the Government intervenes in an industry, it is normally to fix a problem and oftentimes it’s a problem that the industry in question cannot fix within itself.

And so it appears within our industry today, that the amount of insolvencies and non-payments to subcontractors and the associated hardship created, has reached a level that cannot be ignored. Whether or not this legal measure will provide the solution required remains to be seen.

 

Recent Queensland Insolvencies

  • Ostwald Bros Pty Ltd ‐ $61million
  • Cullen Group Pty Ltd ‐ $18million
  • Bloomer Constructions (Qld) Pty Ltd ‐ $14million
  • Gary Deane Constructions Pty Ltd ‐ $13million
  • Bluestone Constructions Pty Ltd ‐ $6.8million
  • CKP Constructions Pty Ltd ‐ $3million
  • DJ Builders & Son Pty Ltd ‐ $2million
  • Batir Pty Ltd ‐ $2million
  • Ware Building Pty Ltd ‐ $1million

 

What is a Project Bank Account (PBA)

A project bank account is a trust over the following amounts:

  • an amount paid by the principal to the head contractor under a building contract
  • an amount a subcontractor is entitled to be paid by the head contractor under a first tier subcontract
  • a retention amount withheld from a subcontractor under a first tier subcontract
  • an amount that is the subject of a payment dispute.

When are PBAs required?

  • PBAs are required for “PBA contracts”.
  • A contract is a PBA contract if:
    1. the principal is the State or a government owned corporation/local authority that opts in;
    2. the contract price is between $1million and $10million;
    3. more than 50% of the contract price is for “building work”.
  • If above features are present and the head contractor enters into a subcontract then a PBA is required.

Currently this is aimed at larger building projects, so there are sections of the industry not effected. When introduced into the private sector in March this year, any private sector project over $1M in value will require PBA’s, although civil, engineering and infrastructure projects are excluded. So many in the industry won’t need to concern themselves with the changes and whatever payment problems exist in those sectors will presumably continue.

Most legislation has unintended consequences and it is most likely that this legislation will follow that pattern. It’s likely that this will have a ‘shake-out’ effect where head contractors that do not have sufficient liquidity will be caught out or be unable to effectively tender for certain contracts.

We’ve all heard about Laing O’Rourke’s problem late year when their building license was suspended in Queensland due to insufficient equity held by the business.

Larger and more highly resourced companies will be able to use this to their advantage and effectively use the legislation to out-manoeuvre their competition.

Important points to note:

  • A building contract can become a PBA contract after it is signed
  • “Subcontractors” are beneficiaries but not “suppliers”
  • More than 50% of the contract price must be for “building work” – definition close to identical to QBCC Act definition
  • “Related entities” provision
  • “Residential construction work” excluded

There are already legal requirements in place which have varying degrees of effectiveness, some of which are ignored, flaunted or only complied with in an ad-hoc manner. Any legal requirement is only as effective to the level it is policed. Good industry players that treat their subcontractors decently and ethically have done so for many decades and enjoy the reputation and trust that comes from such behaviour.

The intention is to catch the underhanded, the game players and to instruct those who may simply be uninformed as to their responsibilities. Those who are determined to behave in an unethical manner will probably continue to do so and the legislation will only be effective in such situations when there is the commensurate level of policing powers by the relevant statutory bodies.

Who is a supplier

  • A subcontractor is a supplier if, under their subcontract, the subcontractor is only required to supply goods or services without also carrying out building work.
  • However, a subcontractor is not a supplier if the goods supplied are:
    • materials or components that were specifically manufactured, or significantly modified, by the subcontractor for incorporation into the building work to be carried out under the head contract for the subcontract; or
    • plant or materials that were specifically manufactured, or significantly modified, by the subcontractor for use in connection with the building work to be carried out under the head contract for the subcontract.

What does it mean to me?

  • It’s our understanding that Construction Modellers will be seen as a supplier by this legislation so will not be directly impacted
  • Fabricators will fall under the Subcontractor definition and will need to comply
  • There is much and more that Construction Modellers can do for their Fabricator clients to assist in cost recovery for variations, and by doing so, improve the likelihood of receiving payment for additional modelling and detailing work.

National Forum for Steel Detailers

The 2019 Australian Steel Convention provides an excellent opportunity for Construction Modellers and Steel Detailers from around Australia to gather and discuss the issues affecting our industry.
The Australian Construction Modellers Association (ACMA) in conjunction with the ASI is holding a forum style event at the convention to facilitate these discussions.

 

ACMA National Forum – Tuesday 17th September 2:00 – 4:00 pm

The Venue for the Convention and Forum is the Westin Hotel, Sydney.
Information regarding the meeting room location will be available from the Convention Registration desk in the Hotel foyer on the day.

The afternoon session concludes with a combined gathering of steel fabricators, modellers and detailers for networking, drinks and canapes.

Please click on the link to the ASI website for more details on the convention.
https://www.steel.org.au/events-awards/australian-steel-convention/


2019 National Forum Registration


To allow us to make appropriate planning arrangements, please register your interest in attending the forum by completing the registration form.

Members please note that the ACMA AGM will be held directly following this Forum.